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written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassination, to the passage of the voting rights act, when numerous of our most distinguished historians say, more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other period in american history. you can stack it up along roosevelt's first 100 days. teddy roosevelt's good times welcomes andrew jackson. none of them excel what got accomplished in that brief period of time, and i think there's a joy and pleasure in reading about it, but i think we still have things to learn. so, anyway, i thought if i took king and johnson together and used them, their relationship, their agreements, their disagreements, i would have slightly new prism to be able to look at why all this stuff happened in that period of time. there were many, many, many factors. when i talk with people, some will say, well, it
in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled completely by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they have been controlling it for over a quarter of a century, to see him get that program up and running and passing it, ramming it through, to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination, is a lesson in what president can do if he not leno's all of the levers to pull but has the will in lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it, to win, is to say over and over again and always saying to myself when i'm doing the research, with hall, look what he is doing here. i try, i don't say i succeeded by try to explain that in my books. it gives a true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. because you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand tim
. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these are things that king gave his life for in the end. why is there so little traction on this issue? >> i think that the civil rights reforms were actually the easier part of his dream. it did not cost anything. there was no appropriation associated with the passage of the civil rights act of 1964 or the voting rights act of 1965. there was not a major investment required. to deal with the issue of poverty, you have to be thinking about a major investment in our declining public education system. you have to be thinking about the h
rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bible, had those of us in lead civil rights organizations, their labor organizations. they're on the platform. not in a guest seat somewhere else, right there only the platform. and martin luther king's son. i mean, i think that he was saying america has changed. and we've got to deal with the change and let's start celebrating the change. >> so, i think he did two things. one, i would agree with you. he said that america is -- has achieved a certain kind of difference that it is different now. but he didn't say i changed it, right? it's that line. s, seneca falls, it is him naming each of the turning point watershed moments in american history in terms of how that change begins to occur. but then he does the thing, of course, that king did in the "i have a dream" speech. he goes all the way back to the initial social contract. he goes back to the nirinitial declaration of independence. he says that the basis of this is in the election, in his right to claim the victory as a ro greszive president. but the real basis for this go
they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the wat
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
term starts with passing medicare, voting rights act, civil rights act just on the triumph of getting social welfare legislation through and here comes vietnam in 1965 overshadowing it all and everything turns and as you're listening to the tapes of these conversations and you hear the despair in his -- the growing despair in his voice as vietnam comes to overshadow everything he wanted to do and that he wanted to started to do in the second term. you see how a second term can go really bad. >> rose: what did he say "that bitch of a war stole --" >> the woman i love, the great society. >> rose: the challenge for a second term? >> well, the challenge i think often times is that a president who's had great reelections suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
. and as it happened -- and i was involved in the civil rights movement when i was in my teens and 20s. i met dr. martin luther king jr. i was doing a play called fly black bird about the civil rights movement. i was a young student activist in that musical. and we sang at a civil rights rally where dr. king spoke. and after that, reca -- rally wa private meeting with dr. king, and i'll never forget that moment when i shook his hand. we are working >> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. any time republicans try to beat up on a clinton, it's always great tv, especially when they get whopped like they did today. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> for me, this is not just a matter of policy, it's personal. >> secretary of state hillary clinton rips open the right wing attack on benghazi. >> the fact is we had four dead americans. >> and knocks down hack -- >> because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night decided they would go kill some americans. >> -- after hack -- >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to f
wanted everyone to fight for their right, their civil rights to stand up for what is right. and to also to speak up when something is wrong. >> today's celebration also honored 16 other asian american and pacific islander civil rights pioneers. >>> we have some new video into the ktvu newsroom of a fatal crash. >> the red and gold well it turns to green. the rush that is on to get just the right set [ crickets chirping ] [ traffic passing ] ♪ [ music box: lullaby ] [ man on tv, indistinct ] ♪ [ lullaby continues ] [ baby coos ] [ man announcing ] millions are still exposed to the dangers... of secondhand smoke... and some of them can't do anything about it. ♪ [ continues ] [ gasping ] >>> our coverage of the 49ers quest for a sixth super bowl championship continues now with a live look at san francisco and as you can see, there it is. the team's flag is flying high near the embarcadero. >>> and that red and gold means green for some bay area retailers. >> reporter: today it seems every few minutes people would come in and head back out with a new tv. perhaps it had something to d
will lead us in the invocation. >> the farmer chair of the naacp, widow of slain civil rights leader edgar medgar evers 50 years ago this year. >> america, we are here, our nation's capital, on this day, january 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama, we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders, the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces; blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream, the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these, flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit o
a reasonable amount of prosecuted. tte departmenn of ustice is now probing whether an derson's civil rights were violated duringg incident. - 3 suupendeddwithhut paa. they still ace an internal affairs inveetigation.... afttr.... he... was... driven - outtof the ity.../ ,intoo.. howard countyy.... and... dropped off by olice... with only his clothes,.../ minus his shoes. johnson as 16 years old,.../ two baltimoree.. police pffiicrs,.../ miiton smith... and... tyronee francis.... picked him up... in west baltimore....// johnson says... they left him... with no hoes, no soccs, no moneyyand no phonn... in theemiddle... teen... eeentually called howard county police... aad... áthhyá... pickkd him up... at... patapsco ssate park.../. friday,.../ a ... jury... ruled in... johnson's... faaor.../ ordering... a... 500--thousand dollar juddmeet. investigators re probing a huge fiie that raceddthroogh a rosedaleestrip mall today. today. they're ppobing whether a grease fire at restaurant may have started phe incident.; the fire hit spread to neighboring ly --3 busine
his religion allows for something he said his faith opposed and now, he believes marriage is a civil right. in the past he flatly declared waits not. did anyone in the main stream media point that out? not a single person. these last four years and events have provided countless examples of the media shirking their response skbriblt not doing their due diligence whit comes to veting obama. maybe it's fatigue from veting. bush administration for eight years. in case you've forgoten how different the coverage was for president bush, here is a trip down memory lane. let's take a look at president bush in 2005 what. a difference. >> world news tonight, sunday, president bush prepares for his second inauguration. >> in a time of war, is it time for a lavish celebration sfl. >> do you think the balls and some of the excess are appropriate? >> many wondered whether, given the war... and all of our security challenges right now is it appropriate to have a lavish inaugural celebration. >> sean: someone pinch me. is there a doubt how biased the main stream media is when it comes to barack obam
of the civil rights act and the voting changes that occurred then. but since then, we've heard no mention of the right to vote in this country being a protected right and the sanctity of that idea. i think the only thing -- first of all, we gotta remember, we vote every two years in this country. not every four. that needs to be the refrain from -- every time you talk about an election, anybody within the sound of my voice needs to -- when they talk about voting or any of those things or what's going to happen in the next election, you're not talking about 2016. you're talking about 2014. those often matter more so because that's when they sneak these folks through. that's when purple districts turn red because people are look the other way or are too busy. thanks for the call. appreciate it. we'll be back right after this. more of "the stephanie miller show". celebrating her mom's 90th birthday. >> she'll be back tomorrow though. >> she will. >> i'm sorry. that's inappropriate. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." desmond tutu said a quote that is one of my favorite quotes. "w
. that was a key victory for civil rights. poll taxes were an essential part of southern state's strategy to block voting. du
legislation that kennedy had introduced that was stalled, that really wasn't going to pass civil rights, the tax cut bill, and in an instant johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very very very much. >> last fall caro took part in the library of congress book festival on the national mall. it's clear he has made johnson come alive for many readers. >> do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him. you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying look what he is doing now. >> he got excited talking about johnson's rise to power as we turn to the final book he is writing now about johnson's president and vietnam, his demeanor has suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon a
but -- . >> look at all the chafes people said couldn't happen: women's rights, civil rights, don't ask/don't tell. sometimes quickly and sometimes slowly, champ will happen when we work for it as a country. >> let us come together to across the nation to re-instate the assault weapon's ban. >> reporter: speakers called for limiting the size of ammunitions clips and to require background checks for all gun sales. after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, eleanor holmes norton said the opus is on ordinary citizens to get involved. >> no more moaning. it's time to do something about it. >> reporter: there were a few people who opposed restricting assault weapons and magazines and requiring all gun purchases to have background checks. >> this won't work or make a difference. >> reporter: what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys who commit the crimes. >> reporter: a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house for success of the obama administration's efforts to control guns. education secretary arne duncan reminded participants that it's going to take more than
, but -- >> look at all the changes people said couldn't happen. civil rights, women's rights, don't ask don't tell. sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> let us come together from across in nation, reinstate the assault weapons ban. [ applause ] >> reporter: speakers called for limiting the size of ammunition clips and for requiring background checks for all gun sales. after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, d.c.'s congressional delegate said the onus is now on ordinary citizens to get involved. >> no more moaning. it's time to do something about it. [ applause ] >> reporter: in the crowd there were a few people who opposed restricting assault weapons or ammunition magazines or requiring background checks for all gun purchases. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> reporter: what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys who commit the crimes. >> reporter: a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house for the success of the administration's to control guns. arnie duncan reminded participants it wil
's rights which later led to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights denl straighters fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn often thought of the birth place of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women sung and unsung who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara
and why now he believes marriage is is a civil right when in the past he flatly declared it was not? and by the way, did anybody in the mainstream media point that out? not a single person. the inauguration and events provided countless of examples of the media shirking responsibility and not doing their due diligence vetting obama. maybe it comes from the fatigue from the vetting the bush administration for eight years and how difference the coverage was for president bush and the inauguration and other events. the trip down memory lanes and look at the coverage of president bush, the inauguration in 2005. what a difference. >> on world news tonight sunday, president bush prepares for his second inauguration. in a time of war and natural disaster, is it time for a lavish celebration. >> do you think the balls and some of the excess are appropriate or is it forgivable. >> many have wondered whether given the war and all of our security challenges right now, it's appropriate to have a lavish and expensive inaugural celebration. >> wow, somebody pinch me. is there any doubt how abusiv
. whether it's civil rights for african-americans or equality for women, or equality for the lgtb community. >> oh, my. he takes on the world and the internet in his new ebook, and he's going to join me live in the studio. you don't want to miss it. progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more... [ midwestern/chicago accent ] cheddar! yeah! 50 percent more [yodeling] yodel-ay-ee-oo. 50% more flash. [ southern accent ] 50 percent more taters. that's where tots come from. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. 50% more spy stuff. what's in your wallet? this car is too small. yeah. t
takes legislation that kennedy introduced, that was stalled, really was not going to pass, civil rights, the tax cut bill, and, in an instant, johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very much. >> chris: last fall, he took part in a library of congress book festival, on the national mall. and it was clear he made johnson come alive for many readers. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him, you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying, look what he's doing now! >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rist, as we tur book, he's writing now, about johnson's presidency and vietnam, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams, that are destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish the last book? >> well, sure! but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four
obama useddat the within the president's speech -- a theme of civil rights and &pequality. --sot-- our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers, and daughters can earn a livvng equal o their efforts. our journee ii not complete unnil ouu ay brothers and sisters &pare treeted likee nyone else under thh law. --track-- thee president's innugural speech pandwiched between poetry aad mussc. the grand finale.. beyooce singiig the national anthem --nats-- --track-- tten the president aad first lady e - same. the whirlwind of a day pommander in chief ball. the will the first lady weer? --sot-- ...michelle obaaa --track-- mrs. obama opted for a long red jason wu gown - the same designer she wore to the inaugural balls four years ago. the first couple enjoyed including the debt ceiling, r gun connrol and immigratioo reffrm..--rene on camera tag-- the first white house riefing will happee today at 11:30 a.m. with ress secretaay jay carney. congress gets back to work todaa as well. &p1) so what haapens now to michelle obama's inaugural president's schedull on hii pirst official da
history. the pioneers went over the rocky mountains. we got through world war ii. we did the civil rights movement. they did it, not we. i mean we that's the whole point. the civil rights movement the gay rights movement the womens movement came from below and leaders responded. it's never coming from the top down. usually change comes from the bottom up. that's where the we is. >> lincoln's second inaugural address was something like 701 words or something. i believe he used the word "i" once in the speech. so could a president these days give a 700-word inaugural address? please? >> we would love it. that means you have to have that poetic compression. linkeningen linkcoln was a writer that knew how to make these things little. we would have to talk more. oh my god. >> doris, let me ask you a question. i want to follow up on this but i want to make sure it's a fair thing to ask. that's the great they think about "morning joe." >> uh-oh. here he goes. >> the great thing about "morning joe" is -- >> what are you doing? >> we fly without -- >> are you thinking? >> we ign
, as if that was -- he called it some sort of new, modern civil rights movement, which is kind of ridiculous. it really left a poor taste i think in a lot of people's mouths. jon: charlie hurt from the washington times. it's good to have you on. thank you, char here. >> thanks, jon. heather: coming up next secretary of state hillary clinton facing tough questions about the terror attack in benge, libya. but what more did we learn about the administration's response to the murder of ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans? we'll take a look. and golf star phil michelson says taxes in california, well they are so high he may have to leave. he's not a loan, though, thousands of californians are facing the possibility of losing mor more than half their income to the tax man. we'll take a look at why. (announcer) at scottrade, our clients trade and invest exactly how they want. with scottrade's online banking, i get one view of my bank and brokerage accounts with one login... to easily move my money when i need to. plus, when i call my local scottrade office, i can talk to someone who knows
like school choice, which i think is the civil rights issue of the next generation, but you know, school choice, what it's fundamentally about is bringing competition to improve public schools and providing hope and opportunity for kids that are trapped and being denied a fair shot at the american dream. whether it's something like social security, personal accounts, which as much as republicans love to put on our green eyeshades and talk about solvency, far more important is the ability of those at the bottom of the economic ladder to accumulate resources and assets that they can use to pass on to their kids and grandkids to buy a home, to start a business, to get an education. whether it is taxes and regulation. let me give a perfect example. one of the best slogans that came out of this last campaign was "you built that." and it was in response to barack obama's terrible but revealing comment, "you didn't build that, you didn't build that small business." that was one of the best moments of the last campaign. but i wish we'd taken a different tack on it because that was a slog
there is nothing they can do. >> it isn't criminal. at this point it's a civil matter between the owner of the property, who is bank of america, and the people who are occupying it right now. >> barbosa was unavailable for an interview but on his facebook page says, a successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks others have thrown at him. i have failed over and over and over again in my life, and that is why i succeed. >> he's simply taken advantage of the fact that the mortgage foreclosure system, if you will, in the state of florida is inundated with foreclosures, and these plaintiffs, these banks and lenders, don't have the manpower to address each individual piece of property. >> reporter: assuming the bank does not step forward, under florida law, the mansion could be barbosa's if he maintains the house and pays the taxes for the next seven years. in a statement, bank of america says it's aware of neighbors' concerns, adding, there is a certain legal process we are required by law to follow, and we have filed the appropriate action. the bank is taking this si
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)